Donald Trump’s Children Wouldn’t Be the First Presidential Kids to Work in the White House

Donald Trump’s Children Wouldn’t Be the First Presidential Kids to Work in the White House

Donald Trump is cheered by his son Donald Trump Jr. at the end of the final presidential debate at the Thomas Mack Center on the campus of the University of Las Vegas, Oct. 19, 2016.

Sixteen children of presidents have worked in the White House with their fathers, by one expert’s count

President-elect Donald Trump’s lawyers may have found a loophole in the so-called “Bobby Kennedy law,” Kellyanne Conway, who managed Trump’s campaign, said on Thursday. The federal anti-nepotism statute could limit the type of jobs he could give to his children, but Conway suggested that the Trump administration might interpret it narrowly.

“The anti-nepotism law apparently has an exception if you want to work in the West Wing because the president is able to appoint his own staff,” Conway said on MSNBC’s Morning Joe. “Of course, this came about to stop maybe family members from serving on the Cabinet, but the president does have discretion to choose a staff of his liking.”

Already, his three children who work at the Trump Organization — Ivanka, Eric and Donald Jr. — are in an unusual position compared to many past presidential children, because they are integral to the President-elect’s career.